Animus Animalis (A Story about People, Animals and Things)

Showings

Scotiabank Theatre 4 Mon, Apr 29, 2019 6:00 PM
Scotiabank Theatre 4 Tue, Apr 30, 2019 12:30 PM
Scotiabank Theatre 13 Sat, May 4, 2019 12:30 PM
Film Info
Runtime:69
Copyright:2018
Country Listing:Lithuania
Premiere Status:North American Premiere
Rating:18A
Festival Info
Festival Year:2019
Language:Lithuanian
Accessibility:Full Subtitles
Program Category:Animal Magnetism
Film Subjects:Agriculture & Fishing
Animals & Animal Rights
Sports & Recreation
Ecology & the Environment
By Program - Sort:Formally Adventurous
Closed Captions & Full Subtitles
Website:http://www.facebook.com/people.animals.and.things
Cast/Crew Info
Director(s):Aiste Žegulyte
Producer(s):Giedre Burokaite
Editor(s):Mikas Žukauskas
Writer(s):Aiste Žegulyte
Titas Laucius
Cinematography:Vytautas Katkus
Composer:Gediminas Jakubka
Mindaugas Urbaitis
Sound:Jonas Maksvytis

Description

A wonder of sight and sound, Animus Animalis explores the complicated relationship between humans and animals, through life and death. Living things become something else entirely after their demise, and the film's opening shot alone—a deceased rodent, illuminated in time lapse—is something akin to a religious experience. How we look at animals and how they see us is the focus of this exquisite corpse. Throughout the film, animals bear witness to a series of oppositions: the horror and honour of dressing a deer, the sacrifice and sacrament of pelts at a church service, the beauty and butchery in a taxidermy workshop, the deification and destruction of set decoration in a diorama. The perpetual presence of animals, from beginning to end, highlights how humans imitate life, defy death and replace nature. Hunters, taxidermists, deer farmers and museum workers all demonstrate how we erase distinctions between reality and artificiality in order to control and stand apart from the natural world. Angie Driscoll

Included Shorts

El Hor (14min) More

Additional Information

  • POV - "A fascinating subversion of an anthropocentric gaze."